Archive for December 2009

Science & Nature Museums

 

Boston

 

Boston Science Museum:  some offerings:  IMAX shows, Planetarium, Simulator Experience, Laser Show, and changing exhibits from a “Butterfly Garden” to “Harry Potter” to “Mapping the World”.     www.mos.org

 

New England Aquarium:  dive into the world of water without getting wet by viewing the giant ocean tank:  explore the numerous exhibits from Amazing Jellies to Amazon Rainforest to Penguins and Sea-dragons.     www.neaq.org

 

Cambridge

 

Harvard Museum of Natural History: was established in 1998 as the public face of three research museums: the Museum of Comparative Zoology, the Harvard University Herbaria, and the Mineralogical and Geological Museum.  Don’t miss the famous Glass Flowers a unique collection of over 3,000 models was created by glass artisans Leopold Blaschka and his son, Rudolph. The commission began in 1886, continued for five decades, and the collection represents more than 830 plant species.

 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology:  one of the oldest museums in the world {1866} devoted to anthropology houses one of the most comprehensive records of human cultural history in the Western Hemisphere.   www.peabody.harvard.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Museums of Contemporary, Colonial, Ancient Art & Antiquities

 

 Concord 

 

Concord Art Association: The permanent collection of the Concord Art Association includes a wide variety of paintings, drawings and sculpture acquired during its early years of the 20th century. Gallery Shows and Juried Competitions. www.concordart.org

 

Concord Free Public Library:  sculptures by Daniel Chester French, a Concord History and Archive and Genealogy collection. www.concordlibrary.org

  

Decordova Musem & Scupture Park:  largest Sculpture Park in New England nestled on a reservoir; Museum with changing exhibitions. www.decordova.org

 

Gropius House: Walter Gropius (1883-1969) was a celebrated German architect and teacher, founder of the school of design known as the Bauhaus in Germany, and a leading proponent of modern architecture. This house was his first architectural commission in the United States, built in 1938 as his family home after coming here to teach at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. This was Walter Gropius’ home from 1938 until his death in 1969. Property maintained by: www.historicnewengland.org

 

 Boston

 

 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum:  a 15th Century Venetian-style Palace housing a collection of 2500 paintings, sculptures, tapestries, furniture, rare books….  all surrounding a spectacular indoor courtyard brimming with flowers and fountains.  www.gardnermuseum.org

 

 Museum of Fine Arts:  check their site for their permanent and changing exhibits, music, film, lectures series and more…www.mfa.org 

 

The Institute if Contemporary Art:  Contemporary Art in all mediums in Boston’s newest Art Museum on the waterfront.  www.ica.org

 

Cambridge

 

Fogg, Busch Reisenger and Arthur M. Sackler Museums:  The Sackler Museum will have an ongoing exhibit until a new building is completed which will incorporate all 3 museums. www.artmuseums.harvard.edu

 

 Longfellow National Historic Site:  built in 1759; used by George Washington as his headquarters for 9 months during the siege of Boston and visited by Benjamin Franklin and Abigail & John Adams; later occupied from 1837-1882 by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and his wife Frances where they hosted Emerson, Hawthorne and Charles Dickens.  www.longfellowfriends.org

 

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology:  one of the oldest museums in the world {1866} devoted to anthropology houses one of the most comprehensive records of human cultural history in the Western Hemisphere.   www.peabody.harvard.edu

 

Lowell

 

New England Quilt Museum:  several exhibits a year showcasing both traditional and contemporary quilts; library and resource center housed in an 1845 Greek Revival Style building.  www.nequiltmuseum.org

 

Whistler House Museum of Art:  a permanent collection of 19th & 20th Century New England Representational artists and etchings by James McNeil Whistler.   www.whistlerhouse.org

 

Salem

 

Peabody Essex Museum:  one of the nation’s major museums for Asian art, including Japanese, Chinese, Korean and Indian along with the finest collection of Asian Export art extant and 19th century Asian photography; the earliest collection of Native American and Oceanic art in the nation- all of exceptional standing.  The historic houses and gardens, and American decorative art and maritime art collections provide an unrivaled spectrum of New England’s heritage over 300 years.  www.pem.org

 

Clinton

 

Museum of Russian Icons:  a collection of 370 Russian icons, the largest in North America spanning six centuries.   www.museumofrussianicons.org

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Homes, History Museums and Historic Sites

 

 

Concord 

 

Concord Free Public Library:  sculptures by Daniel Chester French, a Concord History and Archive and Genealogy collection. www.concordlibrary.org

 

Concord Museum:  a treasure trove of Americana including Period Rooms, Emerson’s Library, Henry David Thoreau’s Flute, Paul Revere’s  Lantern. www.concordmuseum.org

 

Emerson’s Home:  the intellectual center of Concord in the 19th Century. www.rwe.org/emersonhouse

 

Old Manse:  built by Emerson’s grandfather and Hawthorne’s first home when he married and wrote “Mosses from an Old Manse.” www.oldmanse.org

 

Orchard House:  home where Louisa May Alcott wrote “Little Women” and her father Bronson had his school of philosophy. www.louisamayalcott.org

 

Sleepy Hollow Cemetery:  resting-place of the Transcendentalists, Daniel Chester French and their Families among many other Concord notables. www.concordma.com/magazine/novdec01/sleepyhollow.htlm

 

Wayside:  home to the Alcott family, the Hawthorne family and Margaret Sydney.

www.nps.gov/archive/mima/wayside/index1.htm

 

Minuteman National Park:  explore the battlefields and structures associated with April 19, 1775, and witness the American revolutionary spirit through the writings of the Concord authors; visit “Old North Bridge”, site of “the shot heard ‘round the world’; the Battle Road; Hartwell Tavern and more…  www.nps.gov/mima 

 

Lexington

 

National Heritage Museum:  a collection of decorative arts, documents, artifacts, fine arts and photographs related to all kinds of American History with particular attention to the time of the American Revolution;  changing exhibitions  www.monh.org

 

Buckman Tavern; Hancock House; Munroe Tavern:  tour Historic House Museums.    www.lexingtonhistory.org

 

Lincoln

 Gropius House:  home of Walter Gropius, the founder of the German design school known as Bauhaus.  www.historicnewengland.org

 

Boston

 Adams National Historical Park:  the story of four generations of the Adams Family, from 1720-1927, on two sites in Quincy along with a 14,000 volume historic library.  www.nps.gov/adam

 

Boston National Historical Park:  Discover how one city could be the Cradle of Liberty, site of the first major battle of the American Revolution and home to many who espoused that freedom could be extended to all; take a guided walking tour of the Freedom Trail, visit Paul Revere’s House, Old North Church and Bunker Hill Monument and the USS Constitution.    www.nps.gov/bost

 

J.F.K. Library & Museum:  dedicated to the memory of our nation’s 35th President and to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world.   www.jfklibrary.org

 

The Museum of African American History:  dedicated to preserving, conserving and accurately interpreting the contributions of African Americans in New England from the Colonial Period through the 19th century through permanent and changing exhibits.  www.afroammuseum.org

 

The USS Constitution Museum: yards away from “Old Ironsides” brings the story of our nation’s oldest commissioned ship to life.    www.ussconstitutionmuseum.org

 

Cambridge

 

Longfellow National Historic Site:  built in 1759; used by George Washington as his headquarters for 9 months during the siege of Boston and visited by Benjamin Franklin and Abigail & John Adams;  later occupied from 1837-1882 by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and his wife Frances where they hosted Emerson, Hawthorne and Charles Dickens.  www.longfellowfriends.org

 

Lowell

 American Textile History Museum:  one of the largest collections of its kind in the world containing thousands of books, trade catalogs, business records and personal papers, prints and photographs, a costume collection, millions of textile samples, and hundreds of machines used in manufacturing with permanent and changing exhibits.  www.athm.org

 

Lowell National Historical Park:  presents the early story of America’s Industrial Revolution with a guided tour by trolley and/or canal boats on the Merrimack River; exhibits include the Boott Cotton Mills Museum and the Mill Girls and Immigrants.  story. www.nps.gov/lowe

 

New England Quilt Museum:  several exhibits a year showcasing both traditional and contemporary quilts; library and resource center housed in an 1845 Greek Revival Style building.  www.nequiltmuseum.org

 

Whistler House Museum of Art:  a permanent collection of 19th & 20th Century New England Representational artists and etchings by James McNeil Whistler.   www.whistlerhouse.org

 

  Salem

 

Peabody Essex Museum:  one of the nation’s major museums for Asian art, including Japanese, Chinese, Korean and Indian along with the finest collection of Asian Export art extant and 19th century Asian photography; the earliest collection of Native American and Oceanic art in the nation- all of exceptional standing.  The historic houses and gardens, and American decorative art and maritime art collections provide an unrivaled spectrum of New England’s heritage over 300 years.  www.pem.org

 

Salem Witch Museum:  re-creates the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 in a dramatic history lesson using stage sets with life-size figures, lighting and narration with changing exhibits.  www.salemwitchmuseum.com

 

The House of the Seven Gables:  the setting for Nathaniel Hawthorne’s book of the same name; Hawthorne’s Birthplace home is next door to this famous house.   www.7gables.org

 

New Bedford 

 

New Bedford National Park:  visit the “Whalemen’s Chapel” featured in Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick”, the Rotch-Jones House, built in 1834, chronicling 150 years of economic, social and domestic life in New Bedford and more. www.nps.gov/nebe

 

Whaling Museum:  a whaling, maritime and local history museum with an interest in educating the public in the historic interaction worldwide of humans and whales; 7,500 paintings, 3,000 scrimshaw pieces, the world’s largest ship model {89 feet long}, 750 maps, 30,000 books, 180,000 photographs and negatives, and more…  www.whalingmuseum.org

 

Plymouth

 Plymouth Plantation:  visit a re-created 1627 English Village; see the Wampanoag Homesite and learn of these people who have lived in S.E. New England for 12,000 years; come aboard the Mayflower 11 and learn of the 1620 voyage of the Mayflower.     www.plimoth.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cars , Planes, Armor and more…

Stow

 

Collings Foundation:  extensive collection of Aircraft spanning 80 years,  Auto collection from 1901 brass Era to historically significant Race Car, Sprint Cars, Sports Race Cars, Midget Racers, Military Vehicle…in a 70,000 sq. ft. space             www.collingsfoundation.org

 

Brookline

 

Larz Anderson Auto Museum: is home to “Americas oldest car collection”. For over 75 years, the Larz Anderson Auto Museum has been supporting the collector car community through a variety of educational programs, exhibits, and lectures. www.larzanderson.org

 

Worcester 

 

Higgins Armory:  dedicated to the collection, preservation, exhibition, and interpretation of arms and armor with 5,000 objects.      www.higgins.org

 

 

Museums for Children

 Boston

 

Children’s Museum:  numerous permanent and changing exhibits in this 90-year old Museum. www.bostonchildrensmuseum.org   

 

New England Aquarium:  dive into the world of water without getting wet by viewing the giant ocean tank:  explore the numerous exhibits from Amazing Jellies to Amazon Rainforest to Penguins and Sea-dragons.     www.neaq.org

 

Science Museum:  some offerings:  IMAX shows, Planetarium, Simulator Experience, Laser Show, and changing exhibits from a “Butterfly Garden” to “Harry Potter” to “Mapping the World”.     www.mos.org

 

 Acton

 

Children’s Discovery Museum:  the Children’s Museum invites, in small scale rooms, the young ones to explore, in a Victorian House, numerous hands-on exhibits; there are even things for infants and toddlers to enjoy; the Science Museum begins with the parabolic whisper dish, and a variety of sound and music; inside are water and vapor whirling vortexes, rock and mineral explorations and innovative science theme spaces inviting exploration and experimentation.  www.discoverymuseums.org

 

Lincoln

 

Drumlin Farm:  the Massachusetts Audubon society has a working farm and wildlife sanctuary with a learning garden, hayrides and wildlife exhibits.   www.massaudubon.org  

 

Salem

 

Pirate Museum:  board a full-length pirate ship and explore an 80-foot cave while you explore the experiences of New England Sea robbers.     www.piratemuseum.org

 

Masters: 40 Contemporary Art Quilters

November 19, 2009 – February 25, 2010

www.NEQuiltmuseum.org   Explore the cutting edge of art quilting, with today’s most regarded global quilt artists represented in this comprehensive exhibition. Masters brings together works by artists from around the world including Australia, the UK, Japan, Israel, Hungary, France, South Africa, Denmark, and Belgium. A great introduction; for those who have long appreciated the art quilt, a welcome chance to see old favorites and new discoveries.

New England Quilt Museum

New England Quilt Museum

 

“For All Time: Clocks and Watches from the National Heritage Museum”

Through February 21. From waking to the rooster’s crow to catching the 8 am train, how Americans tell and value time has changed over the centuries. Exhibit  explores the story of timekeeping through spectacular objects drawn from the Museum’s own collection.
National Heritage Museum

National Heritage Museum

“Family Trees: A Celebration of Childrens Literature”

 Concord Museum   December 4- January 3. Concord’s literary legacy is given a new creative twistwith trees of all shapes and sizes decorated with inspiration from classic and contemporary children’s books.

Orchard House Holiday Decorations

Orchard House, Home of “Little Women”  will be decorated for the holidays with the festive simplicity of the Alcotts and come alive with costumed “Living History” characters; activities for children and families. December 6,12,13,19, 20.

Orchard House

Orchard House

The Way We Worked

Through January 03, 2010

At the National Heritage Museum

The Way We Worked,”  features 86 photographs from the National Archives focusing on the history of work in America and documenting work clothing, locales, conditions, and conflicts.